BICYCLE DUTCH

All about cycling in the Netherlands

Taking pride in your cycling policies

ʼs-Hertogenbosch (aka Den Bosch*) was the acting “Best Cycling City of the Netherlands” from November 2011 until May 2014. During that time the city made a series of short videos and a very nice infographic to inform about the cycling policies in the city that led to the title. It was obvious from this material that the city is very proud of its award winning cycling policies.

School children with the award on the steps of city hall: signs with the title "Cycling City 2011"

School children with the award on the steps of city hall: signs with the title “Cycling City 2011”

I just found out that the videos were now translated into English and recently published on YouTube. So I must share them with you!

The cycle network of ʼs-Hertogenbosch

 

Cycling in the ‘pedestrian’ shopping city centre of ʼs-Hertogenbosch

 

Bicycle parking facilities in the city centre

 

Amenities at the bicycle parking facilities in the city centre

 

Multi-modal transport; combining (rental) bicycle and train

As a bonus: isn’t it nice that you now finally know how to pronounce ʼs-Hertogenbosch as a native English speaker? The videos point to the city’s website for more information. But unfortunately that website is in Dutch only… www.s-hertogenbosch.nl/fietsen

The infographic was also not (yet) translated into English (at least not to my knowledge). Which is a shame because this is a really nice infographic, in its bright and happy colours. The policy was introduced in 2009 and green and purple are the colours visible in every expression, even in the bicycle parking facilities on the walls. Since I happen to understand Dutch (and a bit of English) and I know how to alter a PDF-file, I was able to give it a go. Therefore below, an English version of the infographic, roughly translated by yours truly!

infographic-english-full

The infographic of the municipality of ‘s-Hertogenbosch about the city’s cycling policies.

(The English version in PDF. The original Dutch Version is on the city’s website.)

ʼs-Hertogenbosch was succeeded by Zwolle in May 2014. But cities that won this honourable title are allowed to keep calling themselves “Fietsstad” or Cycling City. And in the case of ʼs-Hertogenbosch that is deserved, because the city keeps on investing in improving the city for cycling. Many examples on this blog make that clear.

* The city of ʼs-Hertogenbosch is officially called exactly that and that name should be used in writing. But the city has an alternative name as well. The abbreviation “Den Bosch” is widely used when people speak about the city.

10 comments on “Taking pride in your cycling policies

  1. I think I’m going to stick with Den Bosch.

  2. Robert
    1 June 2015

    Why does the traffic light near the bottom of the infographic have green on the top and red on the bottom?

  3. Pingback: Conference. InterCITY III – European Peer Learning of Local Departments for Youth Work. Netherlands | Youth In Advancement 18+

  4. Koen van Waes
    21 September 2014

    We also have an official English translation of our infographic, which we use when people from abroad visit our city to learn about our cycling policy.
    It’s on this website:
    http://www.naviki.org/nl/discoverdutchcycling/cycling-routes/

    Also we’ve created a cycling route in gps with Naviki if you want to cycle around ‘s-Hertogenbosch to watch the best examples of our bicycle policy.
    Yoy can find it also with the link above.

  5. crank
    12 September 2014

    okay, i’m practicing my ass off trying to say “ʼs-Hertogenbosch”. Can I relocate here now?

    • Robert
      1 June 2015

      Not until you have somewhere to stay, otherwise the police might drag you to a shelter for vagrants.

  6. Vladimir Zlokazov
    8 September 2014

    It’s interesting to see the promotional part of cycling policy. “Build it and they will come” is true, but actually motivating people to use the infrastructure is also important. Thank you for taking the time to translate this!

  7. andreengels
    31 August 2014

    I had not seen it before, but there seems to be an error in the infographic (not your error, I checked and the Dutch language version has the same problem): On the map and list of busiest cycling streets, #10 is given to be the Bossche Pad, but that does not correspond with the location on the map. The Bossche Pad goes from point 6 eastward, the dot is placed on the Bruistensingel.

  8. fIEtser
    31 August 2014

    So true, the pronunciation had been a mystery until now!

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This entry was posted on 31 August 2014 by in Original posts and tagged , , .

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